Articles - behaviour

/ thumbnail

Exploring the Ethics and Legalities of Trimming Horses’ Whiskers

Equine psychologist Antonia Henderson, Ph.D., discusses why horses need their whiskers, even if having them means looking less polished in the show ring.

/ thumbnail

Is Licking and Chewing a Sign of Submission in Horses?

Licking and chewing in horses originates from a surge in saliva output as the body switches from the sympathetic to the parasympathetic nervous system.

/ thumbnail

Do Horses Mourn the Loss of Another Horse?

Although there is little research on grief in horses, researchers have documented numerous instances of what looks like grief in a variety of other animals.

thumbnail

What is Horse-Human Heart Coupling?

We like to think we are on the same wavelength as our horses. But recent research into heart coupling indicates that we may not be quite so in sync.

thumbnail

How to Tell if Your Horse is in Pain

Lameness, which would appear to be the most obvious indicator of pain severity, is often not the most accurate assessment of the extent of injury.

/ thumbnail

Can Horses be Depressed?

Since we can’t ask our horses to fill in questionnaires or conduct interviews about their feelings, we don’t know if horses experience depression.

/ thumbnail

Why Does My Horse Crib and How Do I Get Him to Stop?

Cribbing is one of many stereotypies observed in numerous captive species, defined as ritualized, repetitive behaviour that appears to serve no purpose.

/ thumbnail

Mind for the Job: Understanding Equine Personality

Horse industry professionals and amateurs admire equine courage, equine personality, and speak disparagingly of horses who are “gutless.”

/ thumbnail

The Happy Athlete Part 2

In the final part of this series, equine psychologist Antonia Henderson looks at why we need to know our equine athletes better, discover what they need for their psychological well-being, and ensure that it happens.

/ thumbnail

The Happy Athlete Part 1

Can you accurately identify equine psychological well being? In this first of a two-part series, equine psychologist Antonia Henderson explores why our own understanding of a horse's happiness is prone to error.